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thesilvereye:

View the fullsize tutorial on DA | The most handy hair structure tutorials are this video by Proko and thisblog post.These are useful for thinking about the direction hair locks flow with different styles: 1 2 3 4 5 | Painting Realistic Hair | Shading with gradients: 1 2 | Tutorials by me including: Gimp Brush Dynamics, Coloring Eyes and Coloring Method.

All example characters are fromThe Silver Eye webcomic!


azertip:

René Gruau



tohdaryl:

Blue Oni: Cours, petit lapin, cours.
FMM: I’m a fox, for fuck’s sake. 

tohdaryl:

Blue Oni: Cours, petit lapin, cours.

FMM: I’m a fox, for fuck’s sake. 


beastofthewest:

Some hand references.

Sources 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Redid a post by fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn with sources because they never source anything and I don’t want to reblog that post because I don’t want to support blogs who don’t give credit to people

(No, stating that the art is ~not yours~ and ~came from elsewhere~ IS NOT PROPER CREDIT. Many of these have usernames and such on them but not every single one and you still ought to link back to the specific piece)

I couldn’t source the last one so I didn’t include it.


For school I had to make some silly magazine spreads. First time doing them so they are kinda crappy. but I had a lot of fun. :)


brentofthefabulouswild:

Incredible concept art sketches created by production designer Ondrej Nekvasil for Bong Joon-Ho’s visionary science fiction film, “Snowpiercer”.

+++

01. Typical view of a cramped, dark, and grimy corridor within the residential areas of the Tail Section.

02. Gilliam’s Tent, located at the very end of the Snowpiercer, as seen on the outside.

03. Living spaces inside the Tail Section intended to mimic the claustrophobic feel of slums in third-world countries.

04. A sketch depicting a violent, blood-soaked scene onboard the train, which was eventually realized in the film as the memorable battle between the Tail Section rebels and the Front Section soldiers at the Yekaterina Bridge and Tunnel.

05. A verdant rendering of the Greenhouse Section, where it marks the first time the Tail Section rebels encounter the vivid colors of the train. Notice a key difference: the old lady in the sketch is reading a book, whereas in the film, she is leisurely doing her knitting by the fountain.

06. Beyond the fountain stand boxes of carefully cultivated and strictly controlled plants, fruits, and vegetables all flourishing within the limited spaces of the Greenhouse Section.

07. Perhaps one of the most beautiful parts of the Snowpiercer that made Yona Minsoo stare in joyous wonder: a floor-to-ceiling wraparound Aquarium Section filled with marine life.


rufftoon:

veesdumpingrounds:

part 1 of my answer ! I dunno, I hope this is some help or whatever, or at least a goof startpoint for people to debate over the differences between comics and animation ? :) it’s still a good time for you to go check out my comics wwebsite haha 

Reblogging, because very very close to my own experience.


moofrog:

hawfstuff:

I feel like TF2 really established great standard for character design and silhouette even though all the characters are super stylised they still look like real people, every detail feels unique even all their ears are different.
This kind of attention to detail seems pretty underappreciated outside of the fanbase in general.
Plus the amount of personality and expression that comes out of these characters is very self evident in all of the meet the shorts
my two favourites still being Meet the Demoman and Meet the Engineer

Just thought this would be a useful bit of information for young artists when it comes to overall character design, especially when designing a whole cast of unique characters.

DON’T EVEN GET ME STARTED ON HOW BRILLIANT TF2 IS IN TERMS OF DESIGN. It is one of the best examples to show someone when teaching them about character design. 
Like yeah…not only do they have unique noses, jaws, ears even…valve even took the extra step to give them each distinct teeth. 
My character design teacher has brought up TF2, and the concept art by Moby Francke, a few times in class. For one Moby Francke was highly inspired by the great artist J.C. Lyendecker.


And many of the key components in designing the character is gesture, shape and silhouette, and just getting in great key components that create story telling. 
This is one of the reasons I love TF2 so much because it makes me just…art fangasm all over it.

moofrog:

hawfstuff:

I feel like TF2 really established great standard for character design and silhouette even though all the characters are super stylised they still look like real people, every detail feels unique even all their ears are different.

This kind of attention to detail seems pretty underappreciated outside of the fanbase in general.

Plus the amount of personality and expression that comes out of these characters is very self evident in all of the meet the shorts

my two favourites still being Meet the Demoman and Meet the Engineer

Just thought this would be a useful bit of information for young artists when it comes to overall character design, especially when designing a whole cast of unique characters.

DON’T EVEN GET ME STARTED ON HOW BRILLIANT TF2 IS IN TERMS OF DESIGN. It is one of the best examples to show someone when teaching them about character design. 

Like yeah…not only do they have unique noses, jaws, ears even…valve even took the extra step to give them each distinct teeth

My character design teacher has brought up TF2, and the concept art by Moby Francke, a few times in class. For one Moby Francke was highly inspired by the great artist J.C. Lyendecker.

image

image

And many of the key components in designing the character is gesture, shape and silhouette, and just getting in great key components that create story telling. 

This is one of the reasons I love TF2 so much because it makes me just…art fangasm all over it.


theartofanimation:

Zelda Devon